Articles | The Cycle Project - Part 3

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Aug
12
2013
0

Want Faster Results? Try These 3 Food Tricks

Working out hard is an essential part of any fat loss plan. It sculpts your muscles, raises your resting metabolism, whittles down your waist and gives you functional strength and endurance.

The only catch is that you can seriously slow, or even reverse, your results by eating poorly. There’s nothing quite as frustrating as when you are working out like a champ only to face the same belly rolls each morning.

To keep you from giving up in frustration, I’ve put together the following 3 Easy Food Tricks to amp up your results.

Why am I calling these tricks? A trick usually implies that someone is getting fooled, and, well, in this scenario you’re that someone. These tricks will fool your taste-buds and your mouth into thinking that you’re eating your regular favorites, when, in fact, you’ll actually be eating a meal with fewer calories, fewer carbs and more fiber.

This means quicker fat loss and smaller belly rolls.

That sounds fantastic, right? So let’s dig right in…

Easy Food Trick #1: RICE
Rice is a big part of many a meal. There’s white rice, brown rice, stir fried rice, sticky rice, wild rice and the list goes on. All of these kinds of rice (yes, even brown rice) are packed with carb and calories. This is great, if you are a growing child or an athlete, but not so great for someone like you with a fat loss goal.

Rather than give up rice completely, because that would make your veggies and meat look really lonely on a half-empty plate, let’s turn to Easy Food Trick #1.

CAULIFLOWER RICE: Now, don’t get skeptical on me until you give this food trick a try. To make rice from cauliflower first wash it and trim the leaves and stems. Chop into small pieces and then run those pieces through a food processor with the grating attachment. This will result in a rice-like consistency. Place the cauliflower rice in a large skillet with a Tablespoon of olive oil and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and you are good to go. Serve your normal vegetable and meat dishes over a bed of cauliflower rice just as you would traditional rice.

Easy Food Trick #2: NOODLES
Have you ever noticed that when you crave your favorite pasta dish, you’re actually just craving the sauce? Noodles alone are bland and unspectacular. The magic, as well as the protein, is in the sauce.

Noodles, like traditional rice, are packed with calories and carbs that get in the way of your fat loss results. So, rather than just eating a bowl of sauce, try Easy Food Trick #2.

ZUCCHINI NOODLES: Again, try this trick before you knock it, I’m guessing that you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Wash a zucchini, and then run a vegetable peeler down its sides, creating long, wide noodles. Stop when you reach the inner, seedy part of the zucchini. These raw, zucchini noodles do not require any cooking, simply throw them onto your plate and top with your favorite pasta sauce. (Of course, I’m assuming that you’re not going to use a white, cream-based sauce, but that’s another article for another day.)

Easy Food Trick #3: BREAD, BUNS, TORTILLAS
Cauliflower rice and zucchini noodles are all find and dandy for those meals that you prepare at home, but what about your meals eaten out? Many restaurant meals revolve around bread, buns or tortillas. These things are tasty, yet filled with calories and carbs that add to those annoying belly rolls.

That’s when you turn to Easy Food Trick #3.

THE LETTUCE WRAP: This trick is more popular than the first two, so you may already be familiar with it. How does it work? When ordering your meal, be it a sandwich, burger or tacos, ask that it be wrapped in lettuce in place of the bread, bun or tortilla. Most places are really cool about it, and you end up getting to eat the good part of the meal – the meat and flavors—without the carb-filled extras. If for some reason the restaurant is unable to wrap it in lettuce for you, then ask for the filling to be placed on a pile of greens and eat it with a fork.

Try these 3 Easy Food Tricks out for the next 30 days, and see how quickly your fat loss results ramp up. The improved results will motivate you to workout harder and more consistently, which will then add to an even greater level of fitness.

If you aren’t yet one of my clients, now is the perfect time for you to start. My focus is to get you to your goals using my results-driven method.

 

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Aug
11
2013
0

Jamie Oliver: McDonald’s Burgers “Unfit for human consumption”

jamie-oliver-mcdonalds

 

Hamburger chef Jamie Oliver has won his long-fought battle against one of the largest fast food chains in the world – McDonalds. After Oliver showed how McDonald’s hamburgers are made, the franchise finally announced that it will change its recipe, and yet there was barely a peep about this in the mainstream, corporate media.

Oliver repeatedly explained to the public, over several years – in documentaries, television shows and interviews – that the fatty parts of beef are “washed” in ammonium hydroxide and used in the filling of the burger. Before this process, according to the presenter, the food is deemed unfit for human consumption. According to the chef and hamburger enthusiast, Jamie Oliver, who has undertaken a war against the fast food industry, “Basically, we’re taking a product that would be sold in the cheapest way for dogs, and after this process, is being given to human beings.”

Besides the low quality of the meat, the ammonium hydroxide is harmful to health. Oliver famously coined this the “the pink slime process.”

“Why would any sensible human being put meat filled with ammonia in the mouths of their children?” Oliver asked.

In one of his colorful demonstrations, Oliver demonstrates to children how nuggets are made. After selecting the best parts of the chicken, the remains (fat, skin and internal organs) are processed for these fried foods.

In reply to all of the bad press this process has received from Oliver, the company Arcos Dorados, the franchise manager for McDonalds in Latin America, said such a procedure is not practiced in their region. The same, it should  be noted, applies to the product in Ireland and the UK, where they use meat from local suppliers.

In the United States, however, Burger King and Taco Bell had already abandoned the use of ammonia in their products. The food industry uses ammonium hydroxide as an anti-microbial agent in meats, which has allowed McDonald’s to use otherwise “inedible meat.”

Most disturbing of all is the horrifying fact that because ammonium hydroxide is considered part of the “component in a production procedure” by the USDA, consumers may not know when the chemical is in their food.

On the official website of McDonald’s, the company claims that their meat is cheap because, while serving many people every day, they are able to buy from their suppliers at a lower price, and offer the best quality products. But if “pink slime” was really the “best quality” that McDonalds can muster in the US, then why were they able do better in Latin America and Europe? More to the point, why can they apparently do better now in the United States?

These questions remains unanswered by the franchise which has denied that the decision to change the recipe is related to Jamie Oliver’s campaign. On the site, McDonald’s has admitted that they have abandoned the beef filler from its burger patties.

 

Aug
09
2013
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Top 10 Food Ingredients/Additives To Avoid At All Cost

No Junk Food

 Food companies use lots of unhealthful and dodgy ingredients to extend shelf life, add gaudy colors, and make us crave their products.

You can (and should!) steer clear of these toxic, tacky ingredients to protect your family’s health. When enough of us say “no way,” these food companies will get the message and clean up their act.

Here are the top 10 “worst of the worst” in our opinion (not necessarily ranked in order of the harm they do)…(1)

1. Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

What it is: MSG is an amino acid used as a flavor-enhancer in processed foods (one of the most common food additives).

Why It’s Bad: It’s an known excitotoxin, which is a neurotoxic chemical additive shown to harm nerve cells— overexciting them, sometimes to the point of cell death. Regularly consuming excitotoxins like MSG destroys significant numbers of brain cells and can lead to serious health problems, including neurological disorders. (The two other common excitotoxins used in food are aspartic acid (found in aspartame) and l-cysteine, which is used as a dough conditioner.) In addition, regular consumption of MSG has been shown to stimulate the appetite and contribute to weight gain and obesity.

AKA: MSG goes by several aliases, such as Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein, Hydrolyzed Plant Protein, Vegetable Protein Extract, Yeast Extract, Glutamate, Glutamic Acid, Sodium Caseinate, Textured Protein, Soy Protein Isolates, Barley Malt, Calcium Caseinate and Malt Extract.

It’s Found In: Processed foods like salad dressings, low-fat yogurt, canned meats, frozen entrees, potato chips, canned soups (including Campbell’s Condensed Chicken Noodle Soup), and flavored crackers (like Wheat Thins, Cheez-Its and Triscuits).

2. Aspartame

What it is: One of the most widely-used artificial sweeteners.

Why It’s Bad: Like MSG, aspartame is an excitotoxin. It also is believed to be carcinogenic, and produces neurotoxic effects such as headaches, dizziness, blurry vision, and gastrointestinal disturbances.

Aspartame contains 10-percent methanolwhich is shown to be broken down by the body into the toxic by-products formic acid and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is considered to be a potent nerve toxin and carcinogen, which may explain why aspartame accounts for more reports to the FDA of adverse reactions than all other foods and food additives combined.

AKA: NutraSweet, Equal, Canderel, Spoonful, Natrataste, AminoSweet, plus others.

It’s Found In: Over 6,000 products contain it, including diet and sugar-free sodas and drinks, sugar-free chewing gum, yogurt, breath mints, instant breakfasts, frozen desserts, juice beverages, and gelatins.

Avoid Its Pals: Splenda (Sucralose), Sweet ‘n’ Low (saccharine)

3. High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)

What it is: This is a highly-refined sweetener in which corn starch is separated from the corn kernel. The corn starch is then converted into corn syrup through a process called acid hydrolysis.

Why It’s Bad: Nearly all HFCS is made from genetically-modified corn. It is the number-one source of calories in the US diet, and has been shown to contribute to weight gain and the development of diabetes.

HFCS also is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, arthritis, insulin resistance, and elevated triglycerides and raised LDL cholesterol. In 2009, theEnvironmental Health Journal reported that a study conducted by theInstitute for Agriculture and Trade Policy found mercury in 9 of 20 samples of commercial HFCS. The HFCS came from 3 different manufacturers including popular brands such as Quaker, Hunts, Kraft, Yoplait, Nutri-Grain, and Smuckers. Mercury is a heavy metal and is considered a potent brain toxin. The presence of mercury-contaminated caustic soda in the production of HFCS is common.

AKA: Corn sugar, glucose/fructose (syrup), high-fructose maize syrup inulin, iso-glucose, and fruit fructose.

It’s Found In: Soda, salad dressings, breads, cereals, yogurt, soups, lunch meats, pizza sauce and condiments. On average, Americans consume 12 teaspoons of HFCS per day.

4. Refined/Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil

What it is: There are many different kinds of commercially-refined vegetable oils, including soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil, canola oil, and peanut oil.

Why It’s Bad: Refined cooking oils are made by intensive mechanical and chemical processes that extract the oil from the seeds. The refining process also utilizes chemical solvents and high temperatures. The oils are then typically deodorized and bleached. This process removes the natural vitamins and minerals from the seeds and creates a product that has been shown to become rancid and oxidize easily, causing free radical formation.

These oils are also high in Omega-6 fatty acid, which is inflammatory and neutralizes the benefits of Omega-3s in your diet. The oxidation effect has been shown to contribute to inflammation in the body, DNA damage elevated blood triglycerides, and impaired insulin response. Additionally, many refined vegetable oils are hydrogenated. This process creates trans fatty acids, which are known to contribute to heart disease and some cancers.

It’s Found In: Many, if not most, processed foods such as crackers, granola bars, and baked goods use these vegetable oils. They also are popular as stand-alone products (i.e., cooking oils and margarines).

5. Artificial Food Coloring

What it is: If your food isn’t naturally colorful, these additives tint them much like the dyes that color clothing.

Why It’s Bad: Artificial food dyes were originally synthesized from coal tar — and now they are derived from petroleum. They have long been controversial, and are one of the most widely used additives in food products today. Many dyes have been banned because of their adverse effects on laboratory animals. Studies have confirmed that nine dyes currently approved for use in the US raise the following health concerns.

According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest’s (CSPI) study on food dyes, “The three most widely used dyes, Red 40, Yellow 5, and Yellow 6, are contaminated with known carcinogens. Another dye, Red 3, has been acknowledged for years by the Food and Drug Administration to be a carcinogen, yet it is still in the food supply.” CPSI further reports that these nine food dyes are linked to health issues ranging from cancer and hyperactivity to allergy-like reactions.

A large-scale British government study (published in 2007in the UK medical journal Lancet) found that a variety of common food dyes, as well as the preservative sodium benzoate, increased hyperactivity and decreased the attention spans of children. These additives were shown to adversely affect children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), along with children having no prior history of behavior problems.

The European Union (EU) has put labeling regulations in place to inform consumers of the health risks, but the US has failed to follow suit.

AKA: Caramel color, FD&C Blue #1, Brilliant Blue FCF, Bright blue, Blue # 2, Ingtotine, Royal Blue, Red Number 3, Erythrosine, FD&C Red No.40, Allura Red AC, Yellow 5 and 6, FD&C Green Number 3, Fast Green, Sea Green, to name a few.

It’s Found In: Beverages, candy, baked goods, cereal, energy bars, puddings, jams, bread, macaroni and cheese, deli meat, frostings, condiments, fast food, ice cream, sherbet, sorbet, plus meat and fish (to make them appear “fresher”).

6. BHA and BHT

What it is: Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydrozyttoluene (BHT) are preservatives used in many foods to prevent oxidation and extend shelf life.

Why It’s Bad: BHA and BHT are oxidants, which have been shown to form potentially cancer-causing reactive compounds in the body. The International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the World Health Organization, considers BHA to be possibly carcinogenic to humans, and the State of California has listed it as a known carcinogen.

Where It’s Found: In packaging materials, cereals, sausage, hot dogs, meat patties, chewing gum, potato chips, beer, butter, vegetable oils, cosmetics, and animal feed.

7. Sodium Nitrite and Sodium Nitrate

What They Are: These two closely-related chemicals are used to preserve meat.

Why They’re Bad: When added to meat, the nitrates are readily converted to nitrosamines, which are associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancers. This chemical reaction occurs most readily at the high temperatures. In a 2007 analysis, The World Cancer Research Fund revealed that eating 1.8 ounces of processed meat every day increases your cancer risk by 20%.

AKA: Soda niter, Chile saltpeter

They’re Found In: Cured meats, bacon, ham, salami, corned beef and hot dogs, pate, pickled pig’s feet, canned meat (Vienna sausages, deviled ham), smoked salmon, dried fish, jerky.

8. Potassium Bromate

What it is: A form of bromide, it is used as an additive to increase the volume in some breads, rolls, and flours.

Why It’s Bad: It has been shown to cause cancer in animals and is banned in the EU, Canada, and several other countries. The FDA, since 1991, has requested that bakers voluntarily stop using it. It is rarely used in California because a cancer warning is required on the label. Bromide is considered to be an endocrine disruptor.

AKA: Bromic acid, potassium salt, bromated flour, “enriched flour.”

It’s Found In: Most commercial baked goods in the US, including Wonder Bread, Sunbeam, Home Pride (but not in Pepperidge Farm, Arnold, Entenmann’s, and Orowheat brands). It’s also common in flour, and occurs in some toothpaste and mouthwash brands as an antiseptic.

9. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone (rBGH)

What it is: Produced by Monsanto, rBGH is a genetically-engineered version of the natural growth hormone produced by cows. It is used to boost milk production in dairy cows.

Why It’s Bad: “rBGH milk” contains high levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), excess levels of which have been implicated as major causes of breast, colon and prostate cancers. rBGH milk is not required to be labeled.

Giving cows rBGH has been shown to increase the incidence of mastitis. When a cow has mastitis, pus and blood are secreted into the milk. It also leads to antibiotic resistance, which is tied to the spread of virulent staph infections such as MRSA. Hormones in food have also been linked to the onset of early puberty for girls.

Consumer feedback spurred such megabrands as Dannon and General Mills, and the supermarket chains Wal-Mart, Starbucks, and Publix to phase out products with hormones rBST and rBGH.

AKA: Recombinant bovine somatotropin (rBST).

It’s Found In: All dairy products that aren’t specifically labeled “No rGBH or rBST.”

10. Agave Nectar

What it is: This highly-processed sweetener is derived from the agave (cactus) plant. Most agave sold in the US comes from Mexico.

Why It’s Bad: Many consumers believe agave syrup is a healthful sweetener, but it’s anything but. Agave nectar contains the highest amount of fructose (55-97%) among all the commercial sweeteners, including HFCS (which averages 55% fructose).

Fructose has been shown to increase insulin resistance, the precursor to Type 2 diabetes. It is mainly broken down in the liver and then converted to fat. Excessive fructose, when consumed in quantities greater than 25 grams a day, has been shown to elevate uric acid levels, which causes chronic, low level inflammation throughout the body. It is also a main cause of fatty liver disease.

Fructose consumption also leads to weight gain, elevated blood sugar and triglycerides, plus high blood pressure.

AKA: Agave Syrup

It’s Found In: Ice cream, energy bars and cereals, ketchup and other sauces. Agave is also sold as a stand-alone sweetener.

Food label tricks

Here’s a trick food companies frequently used to pack more sugar into their products without making sugar look like the first ingredient:

Ingredient labels, you see, must list the most prominent ingredients first, and some consumers might freak out of they saw a box of cereal that said, “Sugar, whole grain wheat, corn” and so on. Instead, the company uses 3 or 4 different forms of sugar to distribute them farther down the label, like this:

“Whole grain wheat, sugar, corn syrup, corn syrup solids…”

This way, the first ingredients looks like “whole grain wheat” when, in reality, the cereal might be over fifty percent sugars!

How to buy honest food

• Shop at your local farmer’s market, food co-op or CSA.

• In the USA, look for the USDA Organic label on foods. This is more often than not a legitimate claim to being certified organic. It’s one of the few programs run by the USDA that actually has integrity.

• Read the ingredients labels! If you see names of chemicals you can’t pronounce, don’t buy it.  The fewer number of ingredients an item has, the more natural and healthy it is.

• Buy more unprocessed food ingredients and make your own meals rather than buying ready-to-eat, processed foods, which are almost universally formulated with disease-promoting ingredients.

• GROW some of your own food! The best food you can ever eat is food from your own garden.

Conclusion

This is certainly not a complete list of all the unhealthful ingredients in commercial foods today, but these are the ones to avoid like the plague. If you have other nominees, please add them here in the comments below.

If we consumers refuse to purchase products containing these ingredients, the food industry will quit making them. It’s really that simple. (You’d be surprised at how closely food companies monitor their sales!)

“Voting” with your dollars is a powerful and immediate way to influence the quality of food in the supermarket. The more you vote, the faster things will change!

 

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Aug
07
2013
1

Riders For 2013 USA Pro Challenge Announced

2013 Tour de France Winner Chris Froome Confirmed to Compete in 2013 USA Pro Challenge

World’s Top Professional Cyclists Prepare to Tackle the Colorado Rockies in America’s Toughest Professional Cycling Race

 

Denver (Aug. 7, 2013) – Marking one of the best fields ever assembled on American soil for a professional cycling race, the provisionary team rosters* for the 2013 USA Pro Challenge have been confirmed and are headlined by the No. 1 and 2 riders in the world – 2013 Tour de France Champion Chris Froome (GBR) of Sky Procycling and 2013 Tour de France Sprint Jersey Winner Peter Sagan (SLO) of Cannondale Pro Cycling. Coming off a remarkable victory at the most storied professional cycling race in the world, Froome and his team will be racing in Colorado for the first time this year.

 

With a history of attracting the world’s top professional cyclists to Colorado, the USA Pro Challenge will take place August 19-25and will travel through eight official host cities on a scenic tour through the Colorado Rockies. Emphasizing the competitive level of the field, the race will include six current national champions – Fred Rodriguez (USA), Hayden Roulsten (NZL), Luis Enrique Lemus (MEX), Michael Olsson (SWE), Michael Schär (SUI) and Peter Sagan (SLO). Additionally, the race will host six former Olympic medalists and multiple riders who have captured a stage win at the Tour de France.

 

“The diverse field of cycling stars participating in the USA Pro Challenge presents an opportunity to celebrate the sport of cycling on a global scale,” said Rick Schaden, owner of the USA Pro Challenge. “As the race continues to grow, we are seeing increasing enthusiasm from both the fans and the riders, and these impressive rosters are a testament to that.”

 

Schaden goes on to note, “The USA Pro Challenge is quickly becoming a globally recognized leader in cycling. Having the 2013 winner of the Tour de France is evidence of this race’s stature.”

 

The 2013 USA Pro Challenge will include five of the top-10 finishers from last year, including 2012 Champion Christian Vande Velde and second-place finisher Tejay van Garderen. Also featured will be other riders from last year’s final podium, with KOM Champion Jens Voigt and Best Young Rider Joe Dombrowski returning to defend their titles. Additionally, the current and former USPRO National Champions in road race will line up in Colorado (Fred Rodriguez – 2013, Timmy Duggan – 2012).

 

“This competitive level of the field for the 2013 USA Pro Challenge is by far one of the best that has ever raced on American soil,” said Shawn Hunter, CEO of the USA Pro Challenge. “Chris Froome swept headlines last month after winning the Tour de France and to have on the start line for the USA Pro Challenge will be amazing. The competition this year should be faster and tougher than ever.”

 

The elite professional roster of teams, which includes 128 riders from 31 countries, is comprised of seven teams that competed in the Tour de France, four Pro Continental teams and five Continental teams. Following is the preliminary complete list of riders that will be competing in the 2013 USA Pro Challenge.

*Team rosters are subject to change

 

UCI ProTeams

  • BMC Racing Team (USA)@BMCProTeam
    1. Tejay van Garderen (USA)
    2. Stephen Cummings (GBR)
    3. Mathias Frank (SUI)
    4. Michael Schär (SUI)
    5. Greg Van Avermaet (BEL)
    6. Lawrence Warbasse (USA)
    7. Julien Taramarcaz (SUI)
    8. Brent Bookwalter (USA)

 

  • Cannondale Pro Cycling (ITA)@cannondalePro
    1. Peter Sagan (SVK)
    2. Damiano Caruso (ITA)
    3. Alessandro de Marchi (ITA)
    4. Edward King (USA)
    5. Nariyuki Masuda (JPN)
    6. Fabio Sabatini (ITA)
    7. Juraj Sagan (SVK)
    8. Davide Villella (ITA)

 

  • RadioShack Leopard Trek (LUX)@RSLT
    1. Andy Schleck (LUX)
    2. Ben King (USA)
    3. George Bennett (NZL)
    4. Tony Gallopin (FRA)
    5. Andreas Klöden (GER)
    6. Tiago Machado (POR)
    7. Hayden Roulston (NZL)
    8. Jens Voigt (GER)

 

  • Sky Procycling (GBR) @TeamSky
    1. Christopher Froome (GBR)
    2. Richie Porte (AUS)
    3. Joshua Edmonson (GBR)
    4. Ian Boswell (USA)
    5. Joseph Lloyd Dombrowski (USA)
    6. Peter Kennaugh (GBR)
    7. Danny Pate (USA)
    8. Kanstantsin Siutsou (BLR)

 

  • Team Argos-Shimano (NED) @1t4i
    1. Patrick Gretsch (GER)
    2. Thomas Damuseau (FRA)
    3. Simon Geschke (GER)
    4. Tann Huguet (FRA)
    5. Tobias Ludvigsson (SWE)
    6. Luka Mezgec (SLO)
    7. Michael Olsson (SWE)
    8. Nikodemus Holler (GER)

 

  • Team Garmin-Sharp (USA)@Ride_Argyle
    1. Christian Vande Velde (USA)
    2. Thomas Danielson (USA)
    3. Thomas Dekker (NED)
    4. Rohan Dennis (AUS)
    5. David Millar (GBR)
    6. Lachlan David Morton (AUS)
    7. Andrew Talansky (USA)
    8. David Zabriskie (USA)

 

  • Team Saxo-Tinkoff (DEN)@TeamSaxoTinkoff
    1. Michael Rogers (AUS)
    2. Anders Lund (DEN)
    3. Bruno Pires (POR)
    4. Christopher Juul Jensen (DEN)
    5. Jay McCarthy (AUS)
    6. Rory Sutherland (AUS)
    7. Timothy Duggan (USA)
    8. Jesper Hansen (DEN)

 

UCI Professional Continental Teams

    1. Chad Beyer (USA)
    2. Gang Xu (CHN)
    3. Gregory Brenes Obando (CRC)
    4. Chris Butler  (USA)
    5. Craig Lewis (USA)
    6. Ryota Nishizono (JPN)
    7. Chun Kai Feng (TPE)
    8. Ying Hon Yeung (HKG)

 

  • UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling Team (USA) @UHCprocycling
    1. Lucas Euser (USA)
    2. Alessandro Bazzana (ITA)
    3. Jonathan Clarke (AUS)
    4. Benjamin Day (AUS)
    5. Philip Deignan (IRL)
    6. Christopher Jones (USA)
    7. Jeffry Louder (USA)
    8. Kiel Reijnen (USA)

 

  • Team Novo Nordisk (USA)@TeamNovoNordisk
    1. Fabio Calabria (AUS)
    2. Javier Megias Leal (ESP)
    3. David Lozano Riba (ESP)
    4. Joonas Henttala (FIN)
    5. Martijin Verschoor (NED)
    6. Andrea Peron (ITA)
    7. Kevin de Mesmaeker (BEL)
    8. Christopher Williams (AUS)

 

  • COLOMBIA (COL) @Col_Coldeportes
    1. Edwin Alcibiades Avila Vanegas (COL)
    2. Julio Alexis Camacho Bernal (COL)
    3. Robinson Eduardo Chalapud Gomez (COL)
    4. Marco Corti (ITA)
    5. Fabio Andres Duarte Arevalo (COL)
    6. Jarlinson Pantano (COL)
    7. Michael Rodriguez Galindo (COL)

 

UCI Continental Teams

  • Bissell Pro Cycling (USA)@BissellCycling
    1. Phil Gaimon (USA)
    2. Jason McCartney (USA)
    3. Jeremy Vennell (NZL)
    4. Christopher Baldwin (USA)
    5. Jonathan Patrick McCarty (USA)
    6. Carter   Jones (USA)
    7. Michael Torckler (NZL)
    8. Kirk Carlsen (USA)

 

  • Bontrager Cycling Team (USA)@BontragerCT
    1. Nathan Brown (USA)
    2. Lawson Craddock (USA)
    3. Antoine Duchesne (CAN)
    4. Ryan Eastman (USA)
    5. Connor O’Leary (USA)
    6. James Oram (NZL)
    7. Tanner Putt (USA)
    8. Nathan Wilson (USA)

 

  • Optum Presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies (USA) @OPTUMpbKBS
    1. Alexander Candelario (USA)
    2. Marsh Cooper (CAN)
    3. Jesse Anthony (USA)
    4. Michael Friedman (USA)
    5. Tom Zirbel (USA)
    6. Thomas Soladay (USA)
    7. Ryan Anderson (CAN)
    8. Ken Hanson (USA)

 

  • Jelly Belly p/b Kenda (USA)@JellyBellyTeam
    1. Fred Rodriguez (USA)
    2. Morgan Schmitt (USA)
    3. Ian Burnett (USA)
    4. Alex Hagman (USA)
    5. Serghei Tvetcov (MDA)
    6. Sean Mazich (USA)
    7. Luis Lemus (MEX)
    8. Nic Hamilton (CAN)

 

  • Jamis-Hagens Berman p/b Sutter Home (USA) @TeamJamisHB
    1. Janier Alexis Acevedo Calle (COL)
    2. Juan José Haedo (ARG)
    3. Matt Cooke (USA)
    4. Tyler Wren (USA)
    5. Carson Miller (USA)
    6. Luis Romero Amaran (CUB)
    7. James Driscoll (USA)
    8. Ben Jacques-Maynes (USA)

 

On Saturday, Aug. 17, the teams will be introduced to fans at the opening ceremonies and official team presentation, taking place at Base Village Plaza in Snowmass. Celebrity hosts Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen will introduce the teams and riders, giving people a chance to check out the best of the best in cycling before the start of the race. The presentation is free and open to the public, with parking available in the lower lots and parking garage at Snowmass Village.

 

Stages for the 2013 USA Pro Challenge include:

 

About the USA Pro Challenge

Referred to as “America’s Race,” the USA Pro Challenge will take place August 19-25, 2013 and travel through eight host cities from Aspen to Denver. For seven consecutive days, the world’s top athletes race through the majestic Colorado Rockies, reaching higher altitudes than they’ve ever had to endure. After attracting more than 1 million spectators in 2012, making it one of the largest cycling events in U.S. history and the largest spectator event in the history of the state, the USA Pro Challenge is back for 2013. Featuring a challenging, 599-mile course, the third annual race will spotlight the best of the best in professional cycling and some of America’s most beautiful scenery.

 

More information can be found online atwww.USAProChallenge.com and on Twitter at @USAProChallenge.

Aug
05
2013
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Get Back on Track After Your Vacation

So you went away, saw a new part of the world, and now you’re back. You ate, you drank, you relaxed, and then you ate some more.

And now it’s time to face the music.

As you wake up on Monday morning after your week of less-than-healthy eating… Your body is puffy and bloated. Your joints are achy. Your clothes feel tight.

Maybe you are feeling that way right now.

Here are 5 steps to get you back on the fitness fast track after your trip.

Step One: Focus
Your vacation happened. You ate things from the “never eat these” list, you drank more that you should have…but now it’s over.

Draw a line in the sand. You’re back home so the bad eating stops now.

If you’re serious about your fitness goals, then your vacation was the exception, and not the rule. Don’t beat yourself up for letting loose on your trip. Simply get back up, dust yourself off and get focused.

Step Two: Hydrate
While travel days can take on many forms, the end result is most often dehydration and water retention. The only way to restore your balance is to get hydrated.

Your first priority in getting back on track is to drink plenty of water throughout your first few days home. Start with a tall glass of water in the morning, and carry a water bottle with you to sip throughout the day.

Don’t add any artificial sweeteners or stimulants to your water – these will sabotage your hydration efforts. For flavor, add sliced fresh fruit, herbs or vegetables to your water, just like at the spa.

Step Three: Cleanse
For your first few days home I need you to be extra picky about what you eat. Stick with only whole, real foods like fruits, vegetables and lean meats. Whole, real foods will help to restore balance and block out cravings.

Don’t eat any packaged foods for the next few days. This means no snack foods, processed meat slices, dairy, baked goods or alcohol.

Try the recipe for Quick Chicken Stir Fry below – this is a wonderful, whole food dish.

Step Four: Rest
As relaxing as vacation days are, most end with the feeling of exhaustion. Make catching up on sleep a priority over the next few days.

When your body is low on sleep, it becomes easier to make poor eating choices. You’re also less likely to get back into your workouts if you don’t give your body a chance to rest.

Aim for getting a full 8 hours of sleep each night.

Step Five: Exercise
It’s time to sweat out all those vacation indulgences. So lace up your athletic shoes and put on your favorite gym clothes. When you start your first workout, ease in slowly. Take the time to warm up and stretch your muscles before powering up to a solid 30-minute routine.

I have just the exercise plan for you – one that will not only help you recover from your vacation, but will help keep you motivated and going strong in the future.

 

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Aug
05
2013
1

Fighting Childhood Obesity One School Cafeteria at a Time

In the fight against childhood obesity, the weapons have been many. Schools have tried exercise and education, and the government has mandated healthier school lunches. Now a school district in Virginia is believed to be the first in the country to try something radical – redesigning the school building, itself.

“It’s not completely out of thin air,” said public health expert Terry Huang, who helped spearhead the project. “It is rooted in a long history of reinventing school designs to promote learning and mental well-being. We simply took that one step further.”

The result is a new elementary school for 970 kindergarteners through fifth graders that opened this school year in rural Buckingham County, Va. From the ground up, the school is designed to promote activity and healthy eating.

Just walk into the cafeteria and you can see this is no ordinary elementary school.

“One of the most striking differences is the openness of the eating space,” said pediatrician Dr. Matthew Trowbridge, who also consulted on the project.

Students can look into the area where the food is prepared, and they can look outside to a planned school garden, where vegetables will soon be planted.

“The point is that you can see where the food is grown, where it is prepared.” said Trowbridge, who is an assistant professor and associate research director in the department of emergency Medicine at the University of Virginia Medical School. “You are connected with the food service people yourself. It’s very much of a restaurant-style feel.”

The cafeteria also boasts a compost center, and what’s called a food lab to teach about healthy foods. It features a kids’ kitchen.

“The idea is if the kids can grow their own vegetables and make recipes in the kids’ kitchen, it can help them make healthier choices,” said the principal, Pennie Allen.

“We tried to fundamentally change the cafeteria,” said architect Bob Moje, president of VMDO Architects, the Charlottesville, Va., firm that designed and built the new school. “In most all schools, the cafeteria is seen as detrimental to learning. How fast can we herd as many kids through the eating process?”

Instead, Moje said, “The dining experience ought to be part of the educational program for the school.”

Moje half-joked that “public school cafeterias are the perfect training ground for fast-food customers” because there are few menu choices and little time to eat. He’s trying to change that.

Those involved in the project did borrow a page from food marketers.

“The fact is, the food industry understands the power of placing,” said Trowbridge, pointing out that beverage companies place vending machines in easily accessible areas.

So in Buckingham, it’s the water fountains that are placed prominently and feature colorful signs about how drinking water is healthy.

“It was trying to make the healthy choice the easy choice throughout the school,” said Trowbridge.

Using Architecture to Curb Obesity

Huang and Trowbridge have published research on using school architecture to promote healthy eating.

“The guidelines are quite comprehensive,” said Huang, who is the director of health promotion in the College of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

However, he said, even existing schools can adopt some of the practices.

“There are many elements that any school can learn from,” said Huang, who did this research while at the National Institutes of Health.

Those elements include “simple things like placing fruit in a beautiful bowl next to the cashier, instead of chips,” he said. “Research has shown that this increases the likelihood that students will actually pick a fruit.”

In Buckingham, an ethnically diverse district where 60 percent of the students receive free or reduced-price lunches, the changes go far beyond just the cafeteria and food choices.

The school has two levels, with beautiful stairs that lure kids to climb them. It even has cutting-edge chairs that allow kids to move.

“Our chairs are made to wiggle”, said Principal Allen. “The regular student chairs just move, they have some give in them.”

Fourth grader Durwin Westbrook said he liked the new school, including the cafeteria.

“I can sit anywhere I want at the table,” he said.

Kindergartener Elly Abruzzo also found something to like.

“I get to watch them cook,” she told ABC News.

Those behind this innovative school are gathering data to try to quantify the influence of the school building on activity levels and eating habits. There are no formal results yet, but the architectural project designer believes they’ve already succeeded on many levels.

VMDO’s Dina Sorensen said the kids don’t want to go home at the end of the school day.

“Just seeing how joyful the kids are in that space has been really rewarding,” Sorensen said.

 

Source

 

 

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Jul
29
2013
0

The secret to enviable abs…

A toned, lean stomach is the ultimate sign of a fitness plan that’s working.

It’s also one of the hardest things to achieve.

Maybe you’ve given up on your abs after doing thousands of crunches only to see zero results. I honestly don’t blame you.

It’s time that you forget everything you’ve heard about how to sculpt your abs. The truth is that crunches simply won’t give you a six-pack. Ever.

Doing crunches with the hope that it will turn your midsection into a washboard is to operate under the most widely held fitness myth. I’m talking about the spot reducing myth. Here’s the truth: training one area of your body will not specifically burn fat from that area.

Even those who have heard that spot reducing is a myth often still train as if it is true. So here’s the hard truth that you need to face: Doing crunches will not magically make your tummy shrink, it will not cause your muffin top to melt away, and it will not give you washboard abs.

Only a reduction in body fat will give you the stomach you want.

So want the secret to great abs? The secret to great abs is a combination of fat burning cardio, resistance training, and clean eating.

It is very possible for you to dramatically shape up your waistline before the holidays arrive. Yes, I’m talking to Y-O-U. Weight loss is not reserved only for the people you see on the Biggest Loser or on exercise equipment infomercials. You can do it too.

So is your current routine getting you closer to that six-pack, or have you simply been burning time? Answer the following two questions to find out…

How many times per week do you exercise? If you answered with anything less than 4 times a week then that’s the first thing getting between you and streamline abs. What is this fat burning workout that I have mentioned? A routine that incorporates intense cardiovascular interval training with challenging resistance training and circuits. Does this describe what you do?

I’m sorry to be the one to break this to you, but walking on the treadmill for 30 minutes at a comfortable pace isn’t a fat blasting routine. Neither is a leisurely, not-a-drop-of-sweat 20 minutes on the elliptical machine. The truth is that exercising smart allows you to dramatically increase your results while spending less time in the gym.

Cardio exercise is most beneficial when done at an effective level of intensity. This doesn’t mean that you should be out gasping for air. It does mean that you need to dig down and push yourself. Every time.

Resistance training is the second vital part to a workout that burns fat. This means working your major muscle groups against resistance in a way that challenges you and stimulates your metabolism. The key here is to find the right intensity and to keep each muscle group guessing.

Do you eat clean?  Diet is the number one reason that most people don’t have great abs. If your diet is out of control then your abs will be too. To trim your waist, start by trimming the junk out of your diet, regardless of how hard you exercise.  You can’t out exercise a bad diet!

  • Don’t eat too much. Do you know approximately how many calories you eat each day? More importanly, do you know how many calories you NEED to be eating each day?  The best way to find out is to record every single thing that you eat for a few days. Take those numbers and do an evaluation—feel free to recruit me to help out with this part. Together we’ll come up with improvements for your diet and adjust your calories for maximum results.
  • Cut out the junk. While this may seem obvious, your definition of “junk food” may need to be updated. Start with avoiding anything that contains refined sugar, hydrogentated oils, or high fructose corn syrup. Refined sugar is one of the biggest ingredients in the junk food world—it is found in soft drinks, blended coffee drinks, cookies, cakes, packaged snacks, and other sinfully sweet treats. Processed fat is another monster to avoid. As a rule of thumb, view all processed or refined items as junk food, and kick them to the curb.
  • Eat when hungry. You’ve been told to never let your metabolism “crash” by going hours without eating, but it turns out that all-day snacking may be counter-productive if you are forcing yourself to eat unhealthy snacks in the name name of keeping your metablolism high.  Instead of trying to schedule meals and snacks for certain times throughout your day go with how your body feels. If you are hungry then have a small, protein-based snack. Try to teach your body through appropiate sized meals and snacks, to be hungry every 3 or so hours.

Now you know why simply doing crunches will not get you the abs of your dreams. While it is important to exercise your abs a couple of times a week, don’t expect fat to fall of that area after thousands of crunches.

If you seriously want to flatten and sculpt your waist in time for the holidays then all you have to do is decide that you really want it. Commit to yourself. You deserve it.

Come see me for fat blasting workouts that deliver the results you want. Together we will get you on a program that will melt the fat off your abs, exposing shape and definition—with visible results before Christmas.

 

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Jul
23
2013
0

Priming The Pump

Another great video from Zig Ziglar.   You have to put work in, before you can expect to get anything out.

 

Jul
22
2013
0

Make Your Desserts Guilt-Free

Desserts are a delicious and fun part of life that most of us enjoy.
That is until you start working towards a fat loss goal. Then dessert becomes the enemy that pops up at birthday parties and get-togethers in the form of cake, cookies, cupcakes and candy, tempting you to give in.

So what do you do? Give up desserts forever?

Taking a zero-dessert stance can be risky because it increases your chances that the large slice of cake that ends up taking you down will be followed by some ice cream, a handful of cookies and topped off with some chocolates for good measure.

I don’t want your fitness results to be forfeited over a slice of cake, so I’ve come up with the following 7 Steps to Guilt-Free Desserts. Use these steps as your guide to safely navigate sweet temptations and to quickly arrive at your fitness goal.

1) Fruit Is Best.
Fresh, organic, seasonal fruit is the ultimate guilt-free dessert. It’s filled with fiber, vitamins, minerals and delicious, natural sweetness. Don’t be afraid to include some fruit in your diet. Learn to savor and enjoy fruit just as you would a decadent slice of cake. Fruit should be your number one, go-to, favorite dessert.

2) Choose Only Wholesome Sweeteners.
When fat loss is your goal, cane sugar and corn syrup have no place in your diet. Ever. Not even when you indulge in dessert. Lucky for you, there are plenty of more wholesome sweeteners available which will have less of an impact on your blood sugar. Try: raw honey, pure maple syrup, coconut crystals or stevia.

3) Use Whole Food Flours.
So you have your wholesome sweetener and now you’re reaching for some white flour to bake a cake, right? Wrong. Just like sugar, wheat flour should be banned when fat loss is your goal. Try these whole food flours instead: almond flour, coconut flour, flax meal or oat flour.

4) Take Your Chocolate Dark.
If chocolate is your dessert-of-choice then learn to love the dark stuff. 73% cocoa content is a good place to start, then as your sweet receptors become more sensitive you’ll start to like even darker chocolate. Dark chocolate is lower in sugar and higher in cocoa, which is where the actual benefit of chocolate lies: antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.

5) Portion Size Matters.
Yes, this applies even to fruit. When you’re working towards a fat loss goal you do need to control the amount of sugars that enter your body, even when that sugar is wholesome and from a piece of fruit. Keep your desserts to no more than a few bites. Learn to savor and enjoy.

6) Remember Moderation.
If fat loss is your goal, then dessert should not be an everyday occurrence. Lean meats, and an abundance of fresh vegetables should make up the bulk of your diet. Wholesome, portion-controlled desserts are OK to include occasionally, but not regularly. When you’ve met your fitness goal, and are maintaining your results, then you’ll be able to include wholesome desserts more often.

7) Workout Hard.
I would never propose to use food as a reward for exercise, but I will say that working out should be a requirement before including wholesome desserts in your diet. If you’re not working out then even wholesome desserts in moderation could lead to pounds gained. Exercise is a huge part of the puzzle when it comes to losing fat and getting lean.

If you aren’t happy with your current body then feel free to reach out to me. It’s my goal to help each and every one of my clients achieve their best body ever.

 

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Jul
15
2013
0

Make Your Scale Budge

If losing fat were easy then we’d all look like fitness models, right?

Unfortunately, the fat loss game is more frustrating than most care to admit. The scale quickly becomes a dreaded enemy—a constant bearer of bad news.

If the number on your scale won’t budge then read on for an explanation:

Possibility #1: You’re Not Eating Enough Calories
This only happens in cases of severe calorie restriction, so don’t take it as a license to eat whatever you’d like. When you’re trying to drop a few pounds by eating next to nothing, it actually counteracts your efforts.

There’s a base number of calories that you should be eating in order to maintain your proper bodily functions, including fat loss, so check with a doctor or nutritionist to make sure that you’re eating enough.

Possibility #2: You’re Eating Too Many Processed Carbs
Processed carbs will promote fat storage quicker than you can say the alphabet backwards. Blood sugar and insulin levels always respond the same to processed carbs – whether those carbs are in the form of a FiberOne bar or a Twinkie.

You’re fooling yourself, but not your scale, if you think processed carbs should be included in your fat loss diet.

Possibility #3: You’re Doing Too Much Cardio If you’re doing hours of steady-state cardio, it’s gonna end up working against your fat loss efforts. All that cardio promotes the release of stress hormones in your body, which counteracts your ability to lose fat.

See me about designing your ideal exercise routine for maximum fat loss. I’ll let you know how much cardio should be included in your routine.

Possibility #4: You’re Not Getting Enough Sleep
You may not see the connection between your sleep patterns and the number on your scale, but it’s there. Sleep patterns have an impact on your hormone levels, and hormones are a huge factor when it comes to losing fat.

Be sure to get a full eight hours of sleep each night to boost your fitness results.

Possibility #5: Your Snacks Have No Protein
Small, whole foods snacks throughout the day can help maintain your metabolism and encourage fat loss, but it all depends on what you’re snacking on. Fruit-only snacks quickly break down to sugar, which causes insulin to be released and potential fat storage to occur, much like when you eat processed carbs. Sure, the fruit will make less of an impact than a candy bar, but you could be snacking smarter.

Only eat snacks that contain more protein than carbs, and also some fat. This will help to stabilize your blood sugar levels while also keeping hunger at bay longer.

Possibility #6: You Eat Diet Foods
I get it, you have a fat loss goal so it’s tempting to fall into the trap of purchasing foods that claim to help dieters. The problem lies in the fact that these ‘diet’ products have been highly processed and contain potentially harmful chemicals and artificial sweeteners that will confuse your hormones and promote fat storage.

The best diet strategy, when working towards a fitness goal, is to stick with real, fresh, whole foods. Steer clear of anything fake or processed.

 

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